Rabbitmq Cluster on CentOS 7

Step 0. Prelimenaries

Run yum update

$ sudo yum update

Stop the firewall

To make the ports accessible i.e. for clustering nodes use 5672, 4369, and 25672.
$ sudo systemclt stop firewall-cmd

Disable SELinux

$ sudo setenforce 0
The above command will disable SELinux for the session i.e. until next reboot – to permanently disable it set SELINUX=disabled in /etc/selinux/config file.

Set host names

Doing so later will most probably break the installation.
We’ll name the nodes/VMs as rabbit1 (192.168.40.192) and rabbit2 (192.168.40.193) – the default is localhost.

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Install ELK stack on CentOS 7 to centralize logs analytics

What is the ELK Stack?

ELK is an acronym from the first letter of three open-source products — Elasticsearch, Logstash, and Kibana— from Elastic. The 3 products are used collectively (though can be used separately) mainly for centralizing and visualizing logs from multiple servers (as much as you want).
  • Elasticsearch is basically a distributed,  NoSQL data store, that uses on the Lucene search capabilities.
  • Logstash is a log collection pipeline tool that accepts inputs from various sources (log forwarder), executes different filtering and formatting, and writes the data to Elasticsearch.
  • Kibana is a graphical-user-interface (GUI) for visualization of Elasticsearch data.
The ELK Stack is the most widely used log analytics solution, beating Splunk’s enterprise software, which had long been the market leader. The ELK Stack is downloaded 500,000 times every month, making it the world’s most popular log management platform. In contrast, Splunk — the historical leader in the space — self-reports 10,000 total customers.
This tutorial is a guide to set up ELK stack and Filebeat as log-forwarder to gather syslogs of a remote machine (or as many servers as you want).

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Install Elasticsearch 5 on CentOS 7.x

Elasticsearch is a distributed storage and real-time search engine.
  • Distributed storage – you just need to setup and add Elasticsearch nodes, it’ll keep the data distributed on the cluster nodes. The distributed-ness makes data durable and highly-available too.
  • Real-time search engine – You can get to query the data the moment it’s been written.
Due to the above 2 attributes you have been listening and reading about Elasticsearch, wherever there’s a discussion of real-time data analysis. It’d not be an overstatement to say technologies like Elasticsearch set the foundation for any efficient and reliable search engine.

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